The Fighting Sioux of North Dakota Defy the NCAA

The University of North Dakota and the citizens of the Great Plains state are resuming their fight to retain the Fighting Sioux nickname for the university’s athletic teams.  Defying the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) which had threatened the university with sanctions unless it discarded the Fighting Sioux name, logo, and mascot, the college and its supporters, which includes the Spirit Lake Sioux Indian tribe, are attempting to win the day through a state-wide referendum.

And adding an interesting twist to this politically correct soap opera….the Spirit Lake Dakota Sioux have filed suit in federal court against the NCAA over their policy on the use of Native American names and imagery for collegiate sports teams.

Today, the Spirit Lake Tribe of Indians, by and through its Committee of Understanding and Respect, and Archie Fool Bear, individually, and as Representative of more than 1004 Petitioners of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, filed a lawsuit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association ( NCAA) in direct response to their attempt to take away and prevent the North Dakota Sioux Indians from giving their name forever to the University of North Dakota.

In 2009 the Spirit Lake tribe voted overwhelmingly to allow the University of North Dakota to continue using the name “Fighting Sioux.”  In 1969, in a sacred & religious spiritual ceremony, the tribal leaders of the Standing Rock tribe granted perpetual use of the name “Fighting Sioux” to the University of North Dakota.

However, the NCAA has unilaterally decided that the name “Fighting Sioux” is derogatory to the very people who feel honored by the name – the North Dakota Sioux tribes.

These actions are a violation of the religious and first amendment rights of the Dakota Sioux tribes, and show the NCAA believes it knows the interests of the North Dakota Sioux community better than Sioux people themselves.  Devils Lake Journal

And that is the nub of the dilemma: the NCAA does indeed believe it knows what’s best for the Dakota Sioux.  White liberals looking out for the interests of poor child-like People of Color.  If you want to know why the Left continues to act as if it’s 1950 when it comes to the saga of racism in America, just ask yourself what they get out of it.  Today, the most insidious form of bigotry is of the lofty liberal variety and that ilk thrives on smug racial condescension.

About lesbianoutsider

Home of the PushBack Patriot
This entry was posted in Education/Campus, Political/Social and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to The Fighting Sioux of North Dakota Defy the NCAA

  1. Lori Heine says:

    As the direct descendant of Vikings, I insist that the Minnesota Vikings (and my alma mater, Sunnyslope High School) change their nickname IMMEDIATELY! It’s so degrading to see those cartoony blond Vikings — those Hulk Hogans in horned helmets — supposedly representing us!

    I’m so traumatized by it all. I think I may need therapy.

    Seriously, why do white people spend so much time worrying about imagined insults to people of other races? Especially when said people actually seem to take pride in being considered strong and admirable enough for their ethnic symbols to be taken as team nicknames?

    • Perry Palmer says:

      You aren’t just a-woofin’, Lori. Talk about walking on eggshells wherever you go. Even gay people have collectively lost their sense of humor.

    • “Seriously, why do white people spend so much time worrying about imagined insults to people of other races?”

      I think it has everything to do with a politicized anthropology. Us evil white Europeans are condemned because we did what all human populations, including so-called ‘native’ Americans, have done since time immemorial: we moved en masse from here to there in search of resources in direct competition with other peoples. White liberals leech off the very cultural success that they condemn, offering up a perpetual phony obeisance to ‘native’ Americans in endless mea culpa mode for the ‘sins’ of their fathers.

      And an interesting side note: it seems that the Indian tribes in America just may not have been the ‘first’ Americans. New discoveries are indicating that the first Americans could well have been, dare I say it, European. Now ain’t that a kick in the liberal pants.

    • And how about the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame? As a group, the Irish in America have certainly experienced discrimination and is Notre Dame insinuating that the Irish are a rowdy bunch? Since I am half Celtic, I resent such a stereotypic representation of my heritage.

      • Perry Palmer says:

        Well, you should get mad, mad, mad and point fingers and tell us how awful we all are and get militant and break things! :-D

        • I guess I’ll just have to get drunk, start a fight, beat up the old lady when I get home, and then pass out on the floor. After all, isn’t that what the Fighting Irish are all about?

  2. Perry Palmer says:

    Sometimes I think possibly a melting pot really isn’t the best for a whole country. It was such a good idea. Political correctness is squeezing the life right out of what made America great. Real diversity is being replaced by the homogenization of cultures. It’s really sad. When I was young, in the 50s, my family would go on road trips and when we would go to a different area, it was really different. The clothes were different, the food was different and the people were different.

    This link is to a “Thank you” from Japan for the help many countries gave them after last year’s earthquake and tsunami. What I noticed while watching was that Japan has only one culture, everyone is Japanese, except for a few and those few aren’t trying to make everyone else change. It’s quite moving. Get out your hanky.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=SS-sWdAQsYg&vq=medium

    • The video was very touching, Perry, thanks. And you are so right—in the name of diversity we are creating a homogenous glob of sameness with no real respect for differences. And everywhere you go in the USA any more, the regional distinctiveness is almost gone.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s